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12, Some Streeet, 12550 New York, USA
(+44) 871.075.0336
silverscreen@edge-themes.com
Join us for our 6th annual festival November 18-20, 2022
at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ Leslie Cheek Theater
Buy your tickets today!
PEACE PIPELINE (2022)

Comedians and activists Gitz Crazyboy and Tito Ybarra pose as an Indigenous energy company sharing plans to reroute Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline through the wealthy white suburbs of Duluth, MN, to more fairly share the risks oil pipelines bring to Indigenous lands—with shocking and hilarious results.

SCREENING: 9AM | SHORTS PROGRAM
RUNNING TIME: 24M
K’INA KIL: THE SLAVER’S SON (2015)
PRESENTED BY JACK KOHLER

Some fought for gold. The Indians fought for their lives. In 1850, the California sex slave industry was thriving in the mining towns that began popping up along the American River. Young native girls were being kidnapped from their families and tribes. Tintah is a young man whose mother was a slave and he was a product of her servitude. He now is a free man living on the river as a carver and master woodworker. When his love interest is captured by slavers, he sets out to free her. In the end, by serendipity, he must fight the men that captured his own mother and eventually kill his natural father to rescue the woman he loves.

SCREENING: 9AM | SHORTS PROGRAM
RUNNING TIME: 25M
RUNS THROUGH THEIR BLOOD (2022)
Directed by Helen DJ Pyette (Anishinabe from M’chigeeng, ON, Canada)

The film explores the intergenerational effects of the residential school system. Following the discovery of the first 215 children’s graves found in Kamloops, BC in June of this year, students from WFI were inspired to document the impact of the residential schools on Indigenous people and their communities. The film has been made to educate the world through these untold stories and the history from the perspective of the people it affected.

SCREENING: 9AM | SHORTS PROGRAM
RUNNING TIME: 23M
LONG LINE OF LADIES (2022)
Directed by Rayka Zehtabchi and Shaandiin Tome, and made in association with The Pad Project

Long Line of Ladies tells the story of a girl and her community as they prepare for her Ihuk, the once-dormant coming of age ceremony of the Karuk tribe of Northern California.

SCREENING: 9AM | SHORTS PROGRAM
RUNNING TIME: 22M
FIRST LANDINGS (2022)
Presented by writers and directors Federico Cuatlacuatl and Ethan Brown

Ruminating on the shared colonial historical narratives of North American Indigenous communities in what are now Canada, the U.S., and Mexico, First Landings reflects on the initial influx of European Colonization of the New World and its effects on First Nations Peoples through a nuanced approach to non-western cinema.

SCREENING: 9AM | SHORTS PROGRAM
RUNNING TIME: 22M
SAGING THE WORLD (2022)

“Saging” has gone mainstream. This viral trend is now common in movies, TV shows, social media, and cleansing rituals—people burning sage bundles in the hope of purifying space and clearing bad energy. Instead of healing, the appropriated use of saging in popular culture is having a devastating impact.

SCREENING: 9AM | SHORTS PROGRAM
RUNNING TIME: 21M
READING FROM THE SEEDKEEPER
Written by Diane Wilson

Diane Wilson (Dakota Nation) will present a reading from her recent novel The Seed Keeper, the winner of the 2022 Minnesota Book Award in fiction. The author will also discuss her work as the former executive director of the Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance, a national coalition of tribes and organizations working to create sovereign food systems for Native people.

EVENT TIME: 12PM
DISCUSSION ON RECLAIMING TWO-SPIRITS: SEXUALITY, SPIRITUAL RENEWAL & SOVEREIGNTY IN NATIVE AMERICA
Written by Gregory Smithers, forward by Raven Heavy Runner

A sweeping history of Indigenous traditions of gender, sexuality, and resistance that reveals how, despite centuries of colonialism, Two-Spirit people are reclaiming their place in Native nations. Reclaiming Two-Spirits decolonizes the history of gender and sexuality in Native North America.

Gregory D. Smithers is professor of American history and Eminent Scholar at Virginia Commonwealth University and a British Academy Global Professor at the University of Hull in England. His research focuses on Cherokee and Southeastern Indigenous history, as well as gender, sexuality, racial and environmental history. His books include Native Southerners: Indigenous History from Origins to Removal and The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement, and Identity.

Raven Heavy Runner is a Blackfeet and lives in Seattle. He is one of the many Two-Spirit voices reclaiming a tradition that European colonization had nearly extinguished among Native Americans. Raven is an ambassador across cultures, he is active in the revival of Two-Spirit awareness nationwide and he helps to restore indigenous values that emphatically do not include homophobia. He is currently a social worker with the Muckleshoot Tribe in Washington.

EVENT TIME: 2PM
WILDHOOD (2021)
Starring Steve Lund, Michael Greyeyes, and Phillip Lewitski | Directed by Bretten Hannam

On the surface, Wildhood opens at the point of no return for Link, the teenage son of Arvin, his white father, and Sarah, his late Indigenous mother. His childhood, rough and troubled. The pressures of youth have created mounting frustration and anger that he aims inwards and outwards. When he discovers a collection of birthday cards from his mother that his father has hidden from him, he realizes his mother might still be alive. He knows nothing about her or her Mi’kmaw people. For him, this unknown is a path he hasn’t walked, and he senses that it might be the key to finding his place. Burning all the bridges behind him, he and his young half-brother, Travis, head out. On this level, Wildhood is a road trip film, a buddy film, a coming-of-age film, and a coming out film.

Atlantic Film Festival 2021 Winner Best Feature
Canadian Screen Awards, CA 2022 Winner
Cinéfest Sudbury 2021 Winner Best Feature Film
Cleveland International Film Festival 2022 Nominee Best Feature Film
Palm Springs International Film Festival 2022 Winner
Seattle International Film Festival 2022 Nominee Grand Jury Prize Best Feature Film

SCREENING: 2:45PM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 48M
FILMMAKERS RECEPTION IN THE VMFA’S MARBLE HALL
FOR VIP PASS HOLDERS ONLY

Join us for pow wow drumming and dancing by the Adamstown Singers from the Upper Mattaponi, Saponi and Tuscarora tribes and dancers from the Upper Mattaponi, Mattaponi, Chickahominy and Nansemond tribes. Meet our filmmakers and several Native actors in this relaxed and fun environment.

Heavy Hors d’oeuvres and libations will be served.

SCREENING: 2:45PM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 48M
END OF THE LINE: THE WOMEN OF STANDING ROCK (2021)
Produced and directed by Shannon Kring

A group of Indigenous women risk their lives to stop the Dakota Access oil pipeline construction that desecrated their ancient burial and prayer sites and threatens their land, water, and very existence. In the process, they must face the personal costs of leadership, even as their own lives and identities are transformed by one of the great political and cultural events of the early 21st century. Placing their courage in true historic perspective, End of the Line goes to the essence of this astonishing event – “the hearts of the women.”

SCREENING: 7PM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 27M
BRING HER HOME (2022)
Directed by Leya Hale (Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota and Diné Nations)

Bring Her Home follows three Indigenous women – an artist, an activist, and a politician – as they fight to vindicate and honor their missing and murdered relatives who have fallen victim to a growing epidemic across Indian country. Despite the lasting effects from historical trauma, each woman must search for healing while navigating racist systems that brought about this very crisis.

SCREENING: 9AM
RUNNING TIME: 56M
VAYCHILETIK (2022)
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIER SHOWING

A film by Juan Javier Pérez. Through his dreams, José received a gift given by the gods. A gift that brings consequences. Now that he is at a mature age in life, José would like to rest, but he is not allowed. Vaychiletik explores this fierce yet beautiful reality, forged from the dreams of the Mayan people of Mexico.

INDIGINEITY BEYOND THE SOUTHERN BORDER | A FILMMAKERS FORUM CURATED BY FEDERICO CUATLACUATL, PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

FILMMAKERS FORUM EVENT TIME: 10AM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 24M
3 DAYS, 3 YEARS (2022)
A short documentary film by Florencia Gómez Santiz

Elena, a Tzotzil woman from San Andrés Larraínzar, Chiapas, is challenged by the uses and customs of her people when an almost entirely male community assembly appoints her as a municipal trustee. As an authority, she introduces us to the complexity of the system of socio-political organization in San Andrés. During her term of office, the traditional practice of masculinity begins to be questioned.

INDIGINEITY BEYOND THE SOUTHERN BORDER | A FILMMAKERS FORUM CURATED BY FEDERICO CUATLACUATL, PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

FILMMAKERS FORUM EVENT TIME: 10AM
RUNNING TIME: 30M
TIMEKEEPERS OF THE ANTHROPOCENE: TOLCHIKAULISTLI (2022)
Presented by filmmaker Federico Cuatlacuatl

Tolchikaualistli: to exist simultaneously in two places and dimensions of time is an immigrant’s ability to embody a transborder life, navigating the past, present, and future at once. To (be)long is to reclaim territory, in this case it is a transcendence of time and space as a means to reclaim a new dimension of territory or place that must exist in between two worlds, between the past and the future, between two identities, between one’s many selves. Smuggling traditions are acts of resiliency, self-preservation, resistance, and self-rematriation in a dimension of transborder indigeneity and within one’s many selves: to be an alien; to be the other; to be the threat; to be the dream; to be the backbone; to be the invasion; to be a cultural nomad; to be (in)visible; to be 500 years of historical weight; to be a ‘pinche india’; to be hope…

INDIGINEITY BEYOND THE SOUTHERN BORDER | A FILMMAKERS FORUM CURATED BY FEDERICO CUATLACUATL, PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

FILMMAKERS FORUM EVENT TIME: 10AM
RUNNING TIME: 10M
AYOUNGMAN (2021)

Ayoungman tells the tragic story of the racially motivated murder of a much loved 24-year-old hockey star and champion pow wow dancer from the Siksika Nation, the inspiring generosity of spirit in his mother’s response, and the actions of two communities to bring their people together.

SCREENING: 2PM
RUNNING TIME: 38M
GAKAABIKAANG: INDIGENOUS VOICES IN THE TWIN CITIES RIOTS OF 2020 (2022)
WORLD PREMIER SHOWING

Gakaabikaang is a story of Indigenous people and communities in the Minneapolis metro area after the documented police killing of George Floyd. It is journalist Darren Thompson’s first film and features original footage from the frontlines of the protests that turned to violent clashes in city streets between citizens and police. From the burning of Minneapolis to the toppling of the statue of Christopher Columbus, Gakaabikaang features the voices and images of Indigenous people in the midst of one of the most destructive acts of civil unrest in U.S. history.

SCREENING: 3PM
RUNNING TIME: 45M
DARREN THOMPSON | NATIVE AMERICAN FLUTE

Darren Thompson (Ojibwe/Tohono O’ddham) is a Native American flute player and educator from the Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe Reservation in Northern Wisconsin. He is one of Crazy Horse Memorial’s main performers and the opening act of Brulé’s summer concert series in the Black Hills. In 2016, Darren’s dedication to his music earned him a nomination from the Native American Music Awards for “Flutist of the Year” with the release of his second album, “Between Earth and Sky: Native American Flute Music Recorded in the Black Hills.”

EVENT TIME: 3:45PM
DUES (2022)
Directed by Michael R.L. Begay (Previous winner of the TCJ film contest)

Bobby “Dues” Wilson is a Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota actor, writer, poet, visual artist, and a founding member of Indian Sketch Comedy group The 1491s. Before his journey of creating hit television show, FX’s “Reservation Dogs,” he began his career in graffiti street art and spoken-word poetry. Michael R.L. Begay’s documentary follows Dues through his one-month residency in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

SCREENING: 4:30PM
RUNNING TIME: 15M
REZ METAL (2021)

When Kyle Felter, the lead singer of I Don’t Konform, sent out a demo album to Flemming Rasmussen, the Grammy Award-winner producer of Metallica, they never imagined themselves a few months later rehearsing with Rasmussen inside a hot hogan on a Navajo reservation before recording their debut album at the iconic Sweet Silence Studio in Denmark. While following I Don’t Konform’s fairy tale journey, our documentary, Rez Metal, tells the larger compelling story of the heavy metal scene on Navajo reservations, where many youths have grown disaffected as a result of endemic poverty and high rate of suicides.

SCREENING: 7PM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 16M
NEW: ART IS CULTURE, CULTURE IS ART (2022)
Produced, directed, and written by Nathaniel Fuentes

As indigenous fashion continues to demand the attention of the world stage, Lloyd “Kiva” New’s influences and contributions in contemporary Native American art, fashion, and entrepreneurship have impacted generations in the United States and Canada. Lloyd “Kiva” New (1916-2002) was born February 18, 1916 in Oklahoma, of Cherokee and Scotch-Irish heritage. Kiva New graduated from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1938 and later served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He worked with the Southwest Indian Arts Project at the University of Arizona and was a co-founder of the Institute of American Indian Arts.

Before New co-founded the Institute of American Indian Arts, he was a successful Scottsdale fashion designer in the 1940s and 1950s. With his business, New tapped an entirely new market for Native artists, and his garments and accessories were recognized on a scale never seen before in Native clothing design. New became the first Native American to show at an international fashion show in 1951 with his participation in the Atlantic City International Fashion Show. In 1952, his clothing was featured in the Los Angeles Times as the trend to follow, and Miss Arizona Lynn Freyse wore a Kiva creation for the 1957 Miss America Pageant. Because of his accomplishments, New created more opportunities for Native people in the exciting world of fashion design. Kiva New served as IAIA president from 1967 to 1978, and in many other important roles at the school until he passed away in February 2002.

SCREENING: 9AM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 1M
OSAGE MURDERS – REIGN OF TERROR (2022)
Produced and Directed by Dan Bigbee and Lily Shangreaux
Osage Murders – Reign of Terror is a historical documentary focusing on the events that occurred on the Osage reservation in the 1920s. In the early 1900s, death was all too common in the oil boom town of Fairfax on the Osage reservation. Osage people were dying at alarming rates. Local authorities were quick to attribute these deaths to “accident,” “suicide” or “poison whiskey.” But when the Smith home was blown up in Fairfax, it became apparent that someone was murdering the Osage people. The Osage were known as the richest people on earth. Their reservation sat on the largest oil field in US history. The wealth of the Osage was legendary, and everybody wanted a piece of the action. Osage tribal members became the target of every thief and con man for miles.

EMMY AWARD WINNER

SCREENING: 10 AM
RUNNING TIME: 28M
READING FROM THE 4TH WORLD
Hosted by Shelley Niro

The 4th World is a four-episode science-fiction/fantasy television series, with each episode running 60 minutes in length. Discourses of history not often portrayed for television or cinema will stand alone as the series creates a plateau for a stratosphere that has been ignored and not given its rightful voice. Intellectual strength will dominate and a spiritual presence will be born. There will be discussions between Pocahontas, Joseph Brant and other influential characters. A profound assessment of their own portrayal will be examined through the characters’ dialogue with each other.

If only we could go back in time and change the course of North American history. We are all subjects to what is past and what has already happened. We cannot change that path; however, we can rethink it and change our own course of thought and action.

Readers:
Shelley Niro (Mohawk, Six Nations)
ElizaBeth Hill (Mohawk, Six Nations)
Darlene Naponse (Anishnabe, Atikmeksheng Anishnawbek)
Jordan Wheeler (Cree, Ojibway Assiniboine, Irish, English, Scottish)

EVENT TIME: 10:30AM
THIS IS WHO I AM (2022)
Presented by filmmaker Kalvin Hartwig, winner of the 2022 Tribal College Journal Film Contest

A young Anishinaabe woman is feeling overwhelmed and struggling with her identity in the Big City. She wonders what her ancestors would do, but after a short series of events, she realizes exactly what she must do.

SCREENING: 2PM
RUNNING TIME: 12M
HEALING ACROSS THE WATERS: THE HUNA TLINGITS’ JOURNEY BACK TO GLACIER BAY (2022)

Healing Across the Waters is about the evolving relationship—sometimes painful, sometimes joyous—between the Huna Tlingit, the National Park Service, and the landscape of Glacier Bay. It is told through the voices of the Huna Tlingit, the local community, and National Park Service staff. The film features a mix of archival material and visually rich footage from multiple shoots in Alaska to capture cultural practices and the new tribal house and totems in Glacier Bay.

SCREENING: 2:30PM
RUNNING TIME: 30M
BIG CROW (2022)
Directed by Kris Kaczor

Big Crow is a story about the power of hope in the most destitute place in America – South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. By age fourteen, SuAnne Big Crow had become one of the state’s best basketball players. By age seventeen, her wisdom, leadership, and determination had made her a household name across the Great Plains.

Thirty years after her tragic death, SuAnne’s spirit has proven legendary; everyone you meet on “the Rez” has a story about how SuAnne’s pride in her people continues to galvanize the Lakota in their fight to reclaim their language and save their culture.

SCREENING: 3PM
RUNNING TIME: 1h 9m
CALL ME HUMAN (2020)
Directed by Kim O’Bomsawin (Abenaki)

Call Me Human tells an anti-colonialist story about revitalizing and preserving Indigenous languages, history, and culture. Innu writer Joséphine Bacon is part of a generation that has lived through significant changes in Indigenous traditions and colonialist displacement. Born in the Innu community of Pessamit, Bacon was sent to residential school at the age of five and spent fourteen years of her life there. Now, with charm, grace, and quiet tenacity, she is leading a movement to preserve her people’s language and culture.

This endearing film moves with Bacon across Canada — Montreal, Pessamit, and the tundra. In each place she visits, Bacon shares reflections and stories, backdropped by the film’s stunning cinematography. The contrasts between city and wilderness mirror Bacon’s upbringing, creating a poignant sense of the displacement she and her generation experienced. At the same time, the film offers a moving, inspirational meditation on the interconnectedness of language, earth, spirituality, and culture.

Best Canadian Documentary, International Film Festival Vancouver
Best Canadian Documentary, Calgary International Film Festival
Audience Choice Best Documentary, Cinefest Film Festival

SCREENING: 4:15PM
RUNNING TIME: 1H 18M
SNEAK PREVIEW: GIFT OF FEAR FROM ON NATIVE GROUND

Presented by Jack Kohler, Carly Kohler, Koli Kohler, Michael Horse, and Sam Bearpaw

SCREENING: 5:30PM

VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND CULTURE AND POCAHONTAS REFRAMED FILM FESTIVAL SHORTS FESTIVAL
 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10  |  4PM-6PM  |  VMHC’S ROBINS FAMILY FORUM

FREE WITH VIP PASS

OME TLALOC: CEREMONIAL TATTOOS (2021)

This film is about Border Indigenous tattoo artist Ome Tlaloc as he shares his story of the obstacles he faced in his life as well as the insight he received into what inspires and motivates him as an artist and human being.

RUNNING TIME: 8M

TS'OOSTSITSI (YEARS AGO) (2022)

Ts’oostsitsi is a Blackfoot word used to describe the past. The film profiles Ike Solway and his responsibility to continue storytelling in his family. Ike recounts a powerful experience had by his grandfather. What follows is a story that echoes through generations.

RUNNING TIME: 15M

ƛaʔuukʷiatḥ (TLA-O-QUI-AHT) DUGOUT CANOE (2021)

After working as a clearcut logger in what is now known as the Clayoquot Sound, master carver and land defender Joe Martin reconciles his past by revitalizing the ancestral knowledge and artistic practice of the traditional Tla-o-qui-aht dugout canoe.

RUNNING TIME: 11M

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE BAY (2022)

After a year living in a straight-ass New Zealand beach town, First Nations lesbian, Tallulah can stand it no longer– she’s going back to Toronto where the rainbows fly and the glitter sparkles! A comedic cross-Indigenous, Rainbow story about identity, visibility, friendship and hope.

RUNNING TIME: 10M

RESTORING NÉŠKE'EMĀNE (2022)

Since the 19th century, Native American children were sent to boarding schools designed to “kill the Indian… save the man,” destroying Tribal languages, cultural values, practices, and traditions through assimilation. In Oklahoma, generations of Native Americans were educated through the Concho Indian School from 1871 to 1984. The abandoned school buildings have remained for 40 years, riddled with toxins that have leached into the community. Restoring Néške’emāne follows environmentalist Damon Dunbar who has a dream of restoring the land, preserving tribal history, and honoring the attendees of the Concho Indian School in order to speak truth to history.

RUNNING TIME: 11M

SLEEPING BEAR (2022)

A mother bear and her two cubs escape one threat, only to be thrown into another. This retelling of an Odawa legend shows the love a mother has for her babies, at any cost.

RUNNING TIME: 6M

LIVING ROOTS (2022)

Living Roots explores the way land is central to Indigenous worldviews — worldviews that come from traditional knowledge and continue to live in the present

RUNNING TIME: 8M

SALMON REFLECTION (2022)

A respectful contemplation on the role of salmon in creating salmon culture and salmon people

RUNNING TIME: 4M

PAMUNKEY RIVER: LIFEBLOOD OF OUR PEOPLE (2020)

The Pamunkey river, a beautiful body of water located in Virginia’s tidewater region, has been home to the Pamunkey Indian Tribe longer than records have been kept. For thousands of years, the Pamunkey River has connected a people to a place, and has sustained generations of the Tribe.  Today it is under pressure from invasive species and pollution, but a new generation of Pamunkey members, in tandem with government scientists, are working to bring the river and its fish populations back to a healthy place. Follow along as tribal members and researchers explain the unique history of the Tribe and how this river has affected the lives of so many Pamunkey Indians.

RUNNING TIME: 12M

Məca (2021)

A stop motion representation of the late elder Ida Smith telling her grandson the legend of the Mink.

RUNNING TIME: 8M

``THESE AREN'T PEOPLE`` (2022)

The story follows a little girl’s journey after being tear gassed, torn from her mother’s arms, and caged like an animal by ICE agents simply for seeking asylum at the US/Mexico border. A bigfoot comes to her aid and transforms symbols of hatred and fear into symbols of compassion and love.

RUNNING TIME: 7M

POCAHONTAS (2020)

Pocahontas might be the most famous Native American woman in U.S. history. But the story that most people have heard about her—that she saved the life of Jamestown leader Captain John Smith—isn’t even true! Actually, Pocahontas was only about 10 years old when British settlers first arrived at Jamestown. She was the daughter of Wahunsenecawh, leader of the powerful Powhatan Confederacy, an alliance of tribes in Virginia. As a child, Pocahontas was a frequent visitor to the Jamestown settlement—and a symbol of goodwill. Years later, her marriage to a Jamestown farmer ushered in a long period of peace between the two nations. As for that tall tale? It was told by Smith himself—and only after Pocahontas had died at age 22.

RUNNING TIME: 7M

Join us for our 6th annual festival November 18-20, 2022 at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ Leslie Cheek Theater in Richmond, Virginia. Buy your tickets today